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Themed children's bedrooms: for or against?

Themed children's bedrooms: for or against?

Buying a Hello Kitty or Batman room, is it a good idea? The enlightened advice of Dr Stéphane Clerget, child psychiatrist . "You who adore Batman, would you not want a Batman bed and desk?" And the child to acquiesce ... The demand for themed "rooms", branded products, actually comes from parents! "Because they are seduced by the idea of ​​the" perfect "room, and because it is certainly an expensive solution, but less tiring than gradually personalizing the child's room," says Stéphane Clerget. At the time of the child-king, we find it hard to bear that our little ones sleep in an unfinished room, while our adult room is often. Parents also think of pleasing their child by putting under their heads or noses the effigy of their favorite hero, and this is often the case. For a few minutes of pleasure, should we give in to this desire? No, recommends Dr. Clerget. Firstly, because the imagination that this "universe" is supposed to offer is prefabricated, turnkey: for the child, it is in a way sterilizing. And since everything is coordinated there, the child is then discouraged from personalizing his room: in a way, it does not belong to him. If he decides to hang a poster or place a lamp of a different style, the parents then exclaim that it does not go together. Then, this hero adulated today is likely to be dethroned in a few months, when the child has grown up. The great defect of these turnkey rooms, with coordinated bed-desk-wardrobe, is that they do not evolve. The risk is that the child will continue to live in a room with which he no longer identifies. And the fact of constantly seeing the face of Hello Kitty or Cinderella as we approach the age of the baccalaureate does not frankly promote emancipation. Better than ready-to-wear, live tailor-made! "Nothing stimulates the imagination more than a blank wall. It's like the blank page for writing. If the book is already written, you have nothing to do," says Dr. Clerget. The bedroom is the child's universe, his refuge: apart from a standard bed with a good mattress, his toys and a desk, he needs nothing. Leave him free to choose his decoration: if he wants to put a poster on the wall, help him to pin it. If he wants to put stickers, that's fine. Encourage his creativity by devoting for example a wall to personal painting: it is enough to protect the floor with a taped oilcloth to keep the site "clean". When he wants, he can paint what he wants on his wall, cover it at his ease. And if he has a passion for Batman or "The Pirates of the Caribbean", nothing prevents you from offering him a duvet cover easy to recycle in rags the day he cries: "Batman, it's for babies ! "